Category Archives: meta

Announcements about this site or about my other projects such as What’s the Harm.

Content Roundup for September 2012

September finally gave us some time to breathe after the twin excitement of TAM in July and Dragon*Con Skeptrack in August.

It also saw the issuance of my third patent: U.S. Patent #8,266,700 titled “Secure web application development environment“. It belongs to Hewlett Packard, so I don’t get anything from it other than an interesting footnote for my resume.

An unfortunate milestone this month was the return of David Mabus to bothering people using email and Twitter. (He had been posting on YouTube, forums and blogs for a couple of months). That was the reason I posted a how-to on reporting threatening emails this month.

So if you missed any of that, here’s a way to catch up. Below are links to the content I’ve been involved with in the last month. It includes this blog as well as the material I post on other blogs, my podcasting activities, my best posts on Twitter as well as key shout-outs or mentions elsewhere.

In an effort to practice what I preach, I’m also trying to document on a monthly basis what my contributions are to several skeptic-relevant crowdsourcing projects.

Read on to see what you might have missed…

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Content Roundup for August 2012 – Dragon*Con

August didn’t offer much time to recover from The Amazing Meeting before we had to jump right into Dragon*Con. Phew, who has time to read blogs?

Here’s a way to catch up. Below are links to the content I’ve been involved with in the last month. It includes this blog as well as the material I post on other blogs, my podcasting activities, my best posts on Twitter as well as key shout-outs or mentions elsewhere.

In an effort to practice what I preach, I’m also trying to document on a monthly basis what my contributions are to several skeptic-relevant crowdsourcing projects.

Read on to see what you might have missed… Continue reading

Content Roundup for July 2012: TAM was AWESOME

July was all about The Amazing Meeting, both prep work and posts which related to the convention.

There were a couple of non-TAM highlights for me this month too. One was I discovered that back in March, IBM received a second patent in my name (US #8,141,157) on work I did for a subsidiary of theirs over a decade ago.

But the biggest one was the creation of a Wikipedia biography page for me by Susan Gerbic. Thank you so much, Susan, it looks great!

If you missed TAM, or if you were there and wanted more info from one of my presentations, here’s a way to catch up. Below are links to the content I’ve been involved with in the last month. It includes this blog as well as the material I post on other blogs, my podcasting activities, my best posts on Twitter as well as key shout-outs or mentions elsewhere.

I’m also trying to document on a monthly basis what my contributions are to several skeptic-relevant crowdsourcing projects. This ties in with both the workshop and plenary presentation I gave at TAM.

Read on to see what you might have missed…

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#TAM2012 In Memoriam slides

The Amaz!ng Meeting 2012 sponsored by the James Randi Educational Foundation is ongoing in Las Vegas as I type this. As I did for TAM8 and TAM9, I prepared a list of skeptics, scientists and other personalities relating to skepticism who died in the year since the last TAM.

This presentation remembering them ran each morning in the main room on Friday July 13 and Saturday July 14. Here it is:

Thanks in particular to Tim BingaSharon Hill, Natalie JaranJim Lippard, Daniel Loxton, Steven Novella, Lei Pinter, Martin Robbins and Rick Ross for their help in collecting this information and the photos you see.

Content Roundup for June 2012: TAM is Almost Here!

In June I got very busy with preparation for TAM, so I wasn’t able to maintain the blog post pace I set in May.

But I did post some things over at JREF, and there was some good action on other blogs and so on that you may have missed. Here’s a way to catch up. Below are links to the content I’ve been involved with in the last month. It includes this blog as well as the material I post on other blogs, my podcasting activities, my best posts on Twitter as well as key shout-outs or mentions elsewhere.

I’m also trying to document on a monthly basis what my contributions are to several skeptic-relevant crowdsourcing projects. This is in part because of the workshop I’m presenting at TAM 2012 in July, titled “The Future of Skepticism Online: Crowd-sourced Activism”. I hope many of you will join me for that.

Read on to see what you might have missed…

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Content Roundup for May 2012: Summer is Coming

In May I’ve been getting close to the post frequency I had hoped to. I’ve been shooting for about 3 or 4 a week.  Yes, I know many bloggers post multiple times per day.  I’m what some call a slow blogger, and I’m fine with that.

But even at a slow rate, I know people are busy and can’t always follow the posts. If you missed some of the action in May, here’s a way to catch up. Herein are links to the content I’ve been involved with in the last month. It includes this blog as well as the material I post on other blogs, my podcasting activities, my best posts on Twitter as well as key shout-outs or mentions elsewhere.

I’m also trying to document on a monthly basis what my contributions are to several skeptic-relevant crowdsourcing projects. This is in part because of the workshop I’m presenting at TAM 2012 in July, titled “The Future of Skepticism Online: Crowd-sourced Activism”. I hope many of you will join me for that.

Read on to see what you might have missed…

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Content Roundup for April 2012: Flowering

April is the start of skeptic event season in the US, so there was a bit of activity around that. In social media, a tweet of mine about American Airlines quickly became my second most retweeted item ever, thanks as usual to the Bad Astronomer. Also on Twitter, I picked a bit of a fight with some atheists, which resulted in lots of page views here.

Anyway, if you were busy during April and missed some of the action, here’s a way to catch up. Herein are links to the content I’ve been involved with in the last month. It includes this blog as well as the material I post on other blogs, my podcasting activities, my best posts on Twitter as well as key shout-outs or mentions elsewhere.

I’m also trying to document on a monthly basis what my contributions are to several skeptic-relevant crowdsourcing projects. This is part of the build-up to the workshop I’m presenting at TAM 2012 in July, titled “The Future of Skepticism Online: Crowd-sourced Activism”. I hope many of you will join me for that.

Read on to see what you might have missed…

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How many skeptic podcasts are there? Please help me find them all

UPDATE in October 2013: Work is underway to update this census, please go to this newer post.

Last May I attempted to measure the amount of skeptic podcasting being produced. We learned a number of interesting things in that post, one of which was that there are over two hours of new skeptic podcast material being produced every day.

It is almost a year later, and we are coming up on the end of the seventh year of skeptical podcasting. It seems appropriate to revisit the census and see where the current numbers are. Unfortunately, there’s no one place to go to find all the skeptical podcasts. Last year I had to create my list by hand, and I definitely missed several.

This year I have that list to start with, plus some known announcements of new podcasts. But I’m sure I must have missed a few. Check out the list in the rest of this post and let me know which ones I’m missing.

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Content Roundup for March 2012: Spring Cleaning

Spring is arriving in my part of the world, so it is time for some spring cleaning. Some of that is literal, I spent some time cleaning up around the house.

But digital spring cleaning is a good habit too. One thing I’m doing is making a renewed effort to post more regularly at this blog. Cross your fingers, it starts this week.  Another was a format change and new title for my Skepticality podcast segment, which debuted last week.  Read on below to find out more about that if you haven’t heard it already.

Anyway, if you were busy during March and missed some of the action, here’s a way to catch up. Herein are links to the content I’ve been involved with in the last month. It includes this blog as well as the material I post on other blogs, my podcasting activities, my best posts on Twitter as well as key shout-outs or mentions elsewhere.

I’m also trying to document on a monthly basis what my contributions are to several skeptic-relevant crowdsourcing projects. Part of the reason for that is the workshop I’m presenting at TAM 2012 in July is titled “The Future of Skepticism Online: Crowd-sourced Activism”. I hope many of you will join me for that.

Read on to see what you might have missed…

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How Star Trek Prepared Me For Skeptic History

Fittingly, this post about history was sparked by a rash of anniversaries. Today I mark five years on Twitter. March 3rd marked two years since I began my regular Skeptic History segment on Skepticality.  And February 16th was three years since I began posting daily Skeptic History facts on Twitter and Facebook. All told, my skeptic history facts are available in several different locations and formats now.

It occurred to me that someone coming across this project now might wonder how I put together this multimedia empire. Like many hobby projects, it evolved significantly over time – I certainly didn’t plan on it being what it is now.  So I thought it might be interesting to recount the history of the project.  It may be illustrative of how such projects start small, grow and mutate.

In late 2008 I was toying around with some ideas for a new skeptic project. What’s the Harm was a success, but updating it was fairly mechanical and I was looking for a new challenge to go in a new direction. I’ve always been interested in trivia, and was reading all I could about skepticism at that time.

The Skepchick Calendar was a popular skeptic project at that time and I was friends with several people who worked on it. So I started thinking about the idea of a calendar and historic dates. In hindsight I may have also had a vague memory of a non-skeptic publishing project I had done over two decades ago, back when I was in college. It had little to do with skepticism.

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